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Barley heart health claim facts

Barley heart health claim - FDA final rule

Researchers develop functional spaghetti with barley flour

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Barley-in-bagels project

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Barley heart health claim facts

 

Overview

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized use of a health claim for the role of beta-glucan soluble fiber from barley in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease.  The FDA amended CFR 101.81, the regulation authorizing a health claim on the relationship between oat beta-glucan soluble fiber and reduced risk of coronary heart disease to include barley as an additional eligible source of beta-glucan soluble fiber.  The FDA concluded that, based on the totality of publicly available scientific evidence, in addition to certain oat products, whole grain barley and certain dry milled barley grain products are appropriate sources of beta-glucan soluble fiber for the health claim.  A final rule was published in the Federal Register on May 22, 2006.   The ruling is in response to a petition submitted by the National Barley Foods Council in 2004. Read more 

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Researchers develop functional spaghetti with barley flour

Researchers in Italy and Spain conducted tests to determine whether barley could be used to produce “functional spaghetti” by providing fiber and antioxidants.  The researchers developed a barley flour containing the most nutritious part of the grain and used it to make pasta.  They found that the barley spaghetti had more fiber and more antioxidant activity than traditional semolina-based spaghettis. Adding gluten to barley flour improved the cooking quality of the pasta, but lowered its antioxidant activity.  Results from the study were published in the September 14, 2011 edition of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. For more information, check out the barley study abstract.

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Barley-in-bagels project

In 2010, veteran wheat foods specialist, Veronica Jiminez of Mexico City traveled to the Wheat Marketing Center (WMC) in Portland, OR to spend five months working with Dr. Gary Hou, the WMC’s technical manager and Asian foods specialist on a special project with barley.

For The Barley-In-Bagels Project, Veronica used the extensive research and testing facilities at WMC to enhance the nutritional and health benefits of wheat-based foods by using three different types of barley flour.  Products tested included consumer favorites such as bagels, pan breads, instant ramen noodles, cookies and tortillas.  For more information, read this in-depth review of the Barley in Bagels Project.

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Article: Barley basics

Source: Foodproductdesign.com

Originally posted on 06/21/10

By Kris Nelson, Contributing Editor

When someone mentions barley in conjunction with human consumption, the common reaction is, "sure I have barley regularly in my beer" (wink, wink).  In reality, barley ranks among the top 10 crops grown in the world and ranks fourth among cereal crops. 

Barley preceeded wheat as a food grain in ancient Egypt.  Data published by the United Nations in 1990 showed the Middle Eastern and North African countries to have the highest consumption of barley as a food.  Barley is used as an extender of rice and for its health benefits in the cultures of the Far East.  In North America, the bulk of barley grown is used for feed, followed by malting, while millling use accounts for a small percentage of demand. Read more

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